We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!
We were the body!

We were the body!

Trying to work out how our body works we focused on human circulatory system.

The aim of all three activities was learning how it functions and what its elements are for. Two groups were responsible for making a model of blood elements and presenting the crucial information about morphotic elements of blood in a comic or a poster. They made of dough red blood cells, used tennis balls as white blood cells, made pellets and plasma. Next made comics or board presenting the crucial data concerning blood cells. Two other groups made models of life-size circulatory systems in wooden frames. They designed organs and connecting them with blood vessels were able to demonstrate functioning and efficiency of the whole system. The last activity was a drama game, in which students were supposed to present functioning of both respiratory and circulatory systems. All the students were engaged in a play, acting as blood cells or organs. Since the play was performed without use of speech, the special attention was paid to gestures, postures, body movement or hand signals. Students taking part in a drama performed: trachea, lungs, heart, kidney, brain, liver, blood cells, viruses and pellets. They used some stage props like gloves, guns, baklavas or balloons. They passed molecules of oxygen and carbon dioxide to each other showing how circulatory and respiratory systems cooperate and how the circulatory system reacts in case of viral invasion.

Students' response: They liked both activities, especially taking part in the drama. They eagerly accepted their roles and seemed to have a lot fun with playing body parts. All the students could be really close with each other and in spite of quite significant age differences they enjoyed acting together.

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